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Viewing Stones The practice of setting stones on individual stands to represent legendary sites associated with Buddhism originated more than 2,000 years ago in China.  The art migrated to Japan in the 6th century AD where it was refined, and often combined with bonsai. Suiseki is the Japanese term for viewing stones.  It literally means "water stone."  Traditionally, suiseki or viewing stones are exhibited on a carved wood base called a diaza, or in a tray called a suiban.  Sand, water, bonsai plants, or a combination of them may accompany the stones. Viewing stones are valued for their naturally weathered beauty, and the images they represent.  Shape, color, surface patterns, and place of origin contribute to their value and appreciation. Finding the stone, imagining its potential, then creating a setting - this is the artistic process. The stones in this exhibit belong to the private collections of members of The Ameriseki Group, an affiliate of the Brandywine Bonsai Society.    
Stones
Brandywine Bonsai Society is an educational organization and as a result, the material in this site may be copied for educational purposes.  If large portions are copied, we would appreciate attribution.  We welcome links to this site. 
Home About Us Meetings Trees Creating Bonsai Pots Display Galleries
Viewing Stones The practice of setting stones on individual stands to represent legendary sites associated with Buddhism originated more than 2,000 years ago in China.  The art migrated to Japan in the 6th century AD where it was refined, and often combined with bonsai. Suiseki is the Japanese term for viewing stones.  It literally means "water stone."  Traditionally, suiseki or viewing stones are exhibited on a carved wood base called a diaza, or in a tray called a suiban.  Sand, water, bonsai plants, or a combination of them may accompany the stones. Viewing stones are valued for their naturally weathered beauty, and the images they represent.  Shape, color, surface patterns, and place of origin contribute to their value and appreciation. Finding the stone, imagining its potential, then creating a setting - this is the artistic process. The stones in this exhibit belong to the private collections of members of The Ameriseki Group, an affiliate of the Brandywine Bonsai Society.    
Introduction Chop Marks Ross Adams Rob Addonizio Jack Bacus Jim Barrett Jason Bloom Richard Boggs Kathy Boheme Max Braverman Jasper Brinton Matt Castle Rose Cheng Dale Cochoy Nikki D'Amico Tom Dimig Michelle Dougherty Nancy Eaton Sharon Edwards-Russel Mike Flanagan Dorie Froning Sue Garner Mark Gordon Don Gould Kevin Goveia Jim Gremel Ted Guyger Michael Hagedorn Wendy Heller Tom Holcolmb Jack Hoover Stacey Hoover Chuck Iker Steve Ittel Jim Jenigen Ely Johnson
Brandywine Bonsai Society is an educational organization and as a result, the material in this site may be copied for educational purposes.  If large portions are copied, we would appreciate attribution.  We welcome links to this site.